Tuesday, December 20, 2005

Guardian Unlimited | Science | Dark chocolate 'may cut smokers' heart risk'

Dark chocolate 'may cut smokers' heart risk'

Ian Sample Tuesday December 20, 2005 The Guardian

Dark chocolate could help smokers cut the risk of serious heart disease, a study at the University Hospital in Zurich has found.
Researchers used ultrasound scans to look at blood flow and clot-causing platelets in the arteries of 25 male smokers after they ate white and dark cholocate. Antioxidants rose two hours after eating 40g of dark chocolate, blood flow was smoother and the build-up of platelets halved.

White chocolate made no difference, they say in the journal Heart. "Only a small treat of dark chocolate may benefit vascular health," said Roberto Corti who led the study.

For Dark 60% Chocolate, Sugar Free, Dairy Free see Plamil

Tuesday, December 06, 2005

Proof that stress makes you sick - Yahoo! News UK

Proof that stress makes you sick - Yahoo! News UK

At last it seems the medical profession is finally catching up with Nutritional Therapy. "Stress makesyou sick" well "durrr". Still it's good to have some "scientifically proven" evidence rather than just common sense and practical evidence that's been around for thousands of years.

Nutrition and Health expert Yvonne Bishop Weston a Nutritionist with The Food Doctor and Foods For Life says "especially in my city clinics I see a lot of patients suffering with the effects of stress - there's lots we can do help andsupport the immune system apart from just recommending Yoga!"

More info at The Food and Mood Project Website

SYDNEY (AFP) - Australian researchers said they had scientifically proven a long-suspected link between emotional stress and illnesses ranging from the common cold to cancer.

The group from Sydney's Garvan Institute found that a hormone released into the body during times of stress, neuropeptide Y (NPY), undermined the body's immune system and literally made you sick.

"Until now there has mostly been circumstantial evidence of a link between the brain and the immune system, but now we

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have that connection," said the institute's Fabienne Mackay.

"During periods of stress, nerves release a lot of NPY and it gets into the bloodstream, where it inhibits the cells in the immune system that look out for and destroy pathogens in the body," she said.

"That stress makes you sick is no longer a myth, it is a reality and we need to take it seriously."

The group's findings were published in Monday's edition of the Journal of Experimental Medicine and the researchers said they hoped their work would lead to new kinds of therapeutic intervention.

Herbert Herzog, another of the scientists, said neuropeptide Y had been known to affect blood pressure and heart rates, but discovering its impact on the immune system opened up new doors for tackling some illnesses.

"That makes you more vulnerable when you for example have a cold or flu and even in the more serious situations such as cancer can be enhanced in these situations," he said on ABC radio.

Other illnesses with a link to stress include rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, type 1 diabetes and lupus, the researchers said.

Mackay stressed that it would take years to develop drugs to counter the affects of NPY and that the best short-term solution for people was to combat their stress.

"The best thing to do is to remove stress from our lives just by reorganising the way we live, changing our lifestyle and using things like yoga and relaxation to the best of our ability," she said.